The Power of Knowing Scope in Post-Production

Looking back at my last few interdisciplinary projects and reflecting has given me some insight into what I should know going into my next projects. The power of knowing my scope as an audio professional is one of, if not, the most important skill I could possess. I'm glad I got a chance to go through the trials and long brain eating hours of trying to fix sounds in a film, because it has given me some interesting insight and judgement of quality coming into a new project. I can now see what may take me longer to do, and believe I can use these skills to give myself realistic deadlines that will give me much needed speed in the many technical areas of audio. 

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I didn't just come up with this realisation on my own. I was watching an episode of MKR with my parents, when I realised...Someone makes the plate scraping noises, they also clean up the kitchen noises and when they present their food to the judges there is a myriad of ADR to be done. Not to mention the huge job of music supervisor. This made me think, speed in post-production is up there with quality, but it's not enough. Speed and quality win hands down, and if I am going to get where I want to be those are the two skills I have to possess. 

This brings me back to scope and how that connects with speed and quality. I now know that the job can be done twice as fast, if every link in the chain is working at 100% quality. So when receiving good audio or a solid production plan, I'll always take those opportunities before un-thought out projects. This may also apply to a project where you receive audio and need to edit or comp takes in order to get it into the hands of a mixer. The mixer will only do as well as you have edited and depending on which takes you have selected, may effect the vibe of a recording. 

Managing My Time

Some interesting ways I can manage my time in the studio might be to use a stop watch or pretend my day finishes earlier than it does. Allowing myself only half the time to finish a project might force me to work faster and to turnover more projects with better result. Check out this article written in Forbes magazine website, where they talk about just that. A more direct way to keep improving the productivity is to keep decreasing the average time it may take to finish projects. In the video below they discuss this with a method using Parkinson's Law

I know my learning on this subject is not done, but the parallels between the quality I have done and what I will do, will be exponentially different thanks to this great realisation. I can only keep developing my knowledge through more and more challenges I face in all types of media projects, but I will face them with a new standard. 

 

References

(2018). Retrieved 24 April 2018, from https://mkr.7plus.com.au/

Forbes Welcome. (2018). Forbes.com. Retrieved 24 April 2018, from https://www.forbes.com/sites/siimonreynolds/2013/11/06/4-ways-to-work-much-faster/#fbaed9778c79

How music supervisors create iconic TV moments. (2018). Vox. Retrieved 24 April 2018, from https://www.vox.com/culture/2017/9/15/16228376/music-supervision-tv-explained-who-picks-songs-for-shows

How To Work Faster: The Amazing Power of Parkinson's Law. (2018). YouTube. Retrieved 24 April 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptSZkp0y0p4

Parkinson's Law. (2018). The Economist. Retrieved 24 April 2018, from https://www.economist.com/node/14116121